Noodling around in the kitchen

Zucchini Noodles … and some fruity insights

I’ve found that I have developed the annoying habit of correcting people when they call a tomato a vegetable. “Actually, a tomato is technically a fruit,” I say smugly, citing the fact that tomatoes develop from the ovary of the plant after fertilization. Imagine my satisfaction upon learning that zucchini (along with cucumbers, eggplants, and other types of squash) are also fruits! You’ll thank me for this nugget of information after you wow everybody at the next cocktail party you attend ūüėČ

But enough about the botanical classification of zucchini. I was quite excited to find two zucchini in our produce box because it meant that I could finally experiment with zucchini noodles. I’ve never met a noodle that I didn’t like, so I hoped that this low-calorie wonder would be the key to my goal of limitless noodle consumption. As this was my first attempt, I didn’t take these noodles to the peak of their culinary potential, but I did discover that zucchini noodles are rather edible and something that I will make again.

Basic Zucchini Noodles

(Inspired by asweetpeachef.com)

Ingredients

  • Zucchini, of course!
  • Other stuff that would taste good with zucchini noodles

Directions

  1. Make zucchini noodles using some type of slicing or peeling implement. (I used a julienne peeler, but you could use a regular vegetable peeler or a mandolin.)
  2. Don’t slice your fingers! Finger noodles are not edible.
  3. Cook the noodles in a pot of boiling water for 2-3 minutes, until noodles are tender but not mushy.
  4. Drain and rinse noodles with cold water to prevent overcooking.

Edibility Evaluation

I was impressed with the overall results of this experiment. The noodles had a good texture, which was quite similar to that of spaghetti noodles. However, I ate a bowl of zucchini noodles with spaghetti sauce and found it a bit watery. I think they would be better mixed 1:1 with regular pasta. I also think these noodles could work well in other dishes, such as a soba noodle stir-fry. For their reasonable success and future potential, I awarded the noodles a 3.5 on the edibility scale. Bill took a break from eating regular spaghetti noodles to try a zucchini noodle. He found it sufficiently edible and gave it a solid 3.0.

Note

  • The noodles I sliced from the seedy core of the zucchini fell apart in the boiling water. I would recommend slicing noodles only from the outer portion of the fruit.
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